Casco Issues X: The Great Method

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Casco Issues X: The Great Method,

Issues 21 May 2007-24 May 2007

Issue nr. 10, 2007 
With contributions by Peio Aguirre, Stuart Bailey, Ricardo Basbaum, Martin Beck, Copenhagen Free University, Stephan Dillemuth, Falke Pisano, Florian Pumhösl, Wendelien van Oldenborgh, Haegue Yang, Stephen Willats 
Edited by Emily Pethick and Peio Aguirre 
Design by Julia Born & Laurenz Brunner 
Distribution: Revolver, Frankfurt en Casco, Utrecht  
English 
Price: €14,50 
SOLD OUT, VIWING COPY AVAILABLE AT CASCO  
 
 
 
Edited by Basque writer/curator Peio Aguirre and Casco’s director, Emily Pethick, Casco Issues X will address the question of methodology in artistic practice. It focuses on the presence or absence of methods, and their ideological connotations and historical backgrounds, in order to examine some of the conditions that surround contemporary art production.  
 
To think about method implies a reflection on the working procedures that all of us employ in our activities, and the – hidden or visible – processes that enable something to come into being. Where as in science the rules of investigation, steps and techniques of analysis and knowledge are very established, these days could one speak of one (or many) defined artistic methods in contemporary cultural practices? 
 
‘The Great Method’ also refers to Bertolt Brecht’s unfinished ‘Me-ti, Book of Changes’, which was unpublished in his lifetime and has never been translated to English. In this Brecht reflected upon his own method and practice. As Fredric Jameson writes in his book ‘Brecht and Method’, here Brecht’s approach emerges as ‘the dynamic balance of opposites, the evolution of events as a process, and acceptance of the inevitability of change,’ foregrounding the potential of connecting things than might appear not to share common ground in order to form a more complex picture of the world. 
 
The editorial of Casco Issues X leads out of this method of connecting things together. Artists were invited to think about the subject of method, or to reflect or demonstrate their own methods. Interlaced with quotes from Brecht’s ‘Me-ti’, translated to English by Ian Pepper, the contributions open up a variety of subjects that include notions of learning and unlearning, construction and deconstruction, mediation and translation, formalism and historicity, forms of participation, and the joining of practice and theory.

Date

21 May 2007-24 May 2007

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